Blog What to do this week: Time to take cuttings

What to do this week: Time to take cuttings

Take advantage of warm temperatures to take cuttings of woody plants like lavender, rosemary, justicia (Brazilian Plume Flower), azalea, camellia, brugmansia (Angels Trumpet) and rhododendron.

Avoid shoots that have flower buds. If possible, take a ‘heeled’ cutting by tearing some wood (heel) from the stem along with the cutting.

This will expose cambium tissue which will produce roots. Remove most leaves and dip your cutting in hormone powder before you insert into the potting medium. Keep just moist and keep your cuttings in bright light but not direct sun.

 


Brugmansia (Angel's Trumpet)

 


Justicia (Brazilian Plume Flower)

 

Save Stephanotis Seed

As your flowering plants finish their flowering and produce seed capsules, it’s good to capture the seed before it is dispersed.

Avocado or chocko looking Stephanotis seed pods are forming but leave them there until yellow then brown. Inside hundreds of viable seeds with hairy parachutes, which will blow around in the wind, or place in paper bag to capture the seed once the woody capsule splits open. Then you can place individual seeds into a tray or pot of seed raising mix. Stephanotis will germinate readily if kept in bright light and just moist.

 


Stephanotis seed pod

 

Feed clivea

A monthly dose of Sulfate of Potash from February to May will encourage your cliveas into magnificent spring bloom. Wait for a shower of rain and very sparingly, sprinkle powdered potash over your cliveas. Alternatively you can dissolve the potash in watering can and water your cliveas.

 

Prune wisteria

Prune the long whippy tendrils of wisteria. This minor prune should be done in late summer after the summer growth flush, and another in winter to prune out the autumn growth flush and shape your plant. With this pruning regime you will get a magnificent spring flowering not hidden by any leaves.

For more information about growing (and flowering) wisteria click here to read our tips from Graeme Parr, leading nurseryman and wisteria expert.

 

 

 


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